Curing Meralgia Paresthetica

Curing Meralgia Paresthetica

This site is devoted to the treatment and cure of meralgia paresthetica, and to the book, Curing Meralgia Paresthetica, downloadable at

Here’s what the chapters cover:

Treat Burning Thighs.

 

Emergency Treatment of Meralgia. If you’ve got a fresh case of Meralgia and your outer thigh, hip, lower back/knee are burning or hurting, this chapter tells you exactly what to do. Immediately.

  1. Diagnosing Meralgia Paresthetica. How can you know if you’ve really got Meralgia, and not something else? This chapter gives you more information than you need to be confident about your diagnosis. It gives it both from the patient’s point of view and fully lays out the doctor’s point of view. Incidentally, some doctors are unfamiliar with Meralgia, so a little self-diagnosis is a good idea.
  2. Natural Treatments for Meralgia Paresthetica. I’m a big believer in avoiding pharmaceutical drugs but, as you’ll see in the book, sometimes when you’re in pain you just have to knock it out before you can think straight. Once you’re thinking straight, consider using as many natural treatments as possible. Fewer side-effects and after-effects and, usually, cheaper (like Epsom salts and ice). This chapter lays out your possibilities and suggestions for each natural remedy.
  3. Drugs for Meralgia. There are drugs – mostly anti-inflammatories and painkillers – that greatly relieve Meralgia symptoms and are generic and cheap. Their side-effects are modest and they even have some bonuses, like euphoria. And heaven knows, Meralgia sufferers need all the euphoria they can get!
  4. Exercises for Meralgia: Laurie Hall’s Advice for Meralgia Paresthetica Sufferers. The founder of Jyme Bodyworks, and one of the world’s most innovative bobyworkers, Laurie Hall, designed these exercises specifically for Meralgia sufferers. Some you can do even in the midst of your suffering, and some are to help you when the worst is over and you ready for rehabilitation. All of them are gentle and simple and, once again, require cheap  or free equipment.
  5. Walking and Sitting with Meralgia. You’ll pick up some useful tips about posture and movement in this chapter. Ways of getting around that stress you less and ways of moving that actually help you heal (or at least don’t make things worse!).20120226-142128.jpg
  6. Articles About Meralgia. Some major articles from newspapers and magazines. Interesting stuff, and consoling to know that others are suffering even more than us.
  7. Recovering From Meralgia. It’s a long and winding road for some of us. More than a year after my encounter with it, I am still doing exercises to rebuild my weakened right leg and to stretch out my shortened right side (yes, the pain causes you to contract not only your leg but also your pelvis, hip, QL and costal muscles). But be patient and persistent and you’ll make a 100% recovery.
  8. Symptoms of Meralgia. Every symptom that’s ever been recorded for Meralgia is listed here. Pick your personal favorites! This list is also handy if you have to apply for disability.
  9. Causes of Meralgia. We know the mechanism – trauma to the lateral femoral cutaneous nerve – but this chapter talks about just how the damage can be done. Forewarned is forearmed: you’ll know what not to do from now on.
  10. Pregnancy and Meralgia. A common occurrance of Meralgia is in pregnancy. Why? What can you do in the midst of pregnancy that’s safe and effective? That’s what this chapter is about. (You can download the book here).
  11. Professional Treatment for Meralgia. There are radical (desperate?) treatments for Meralgia, like surgery. They are dangerous and don’t work very well, so it’s best to try everything else first. This chapter lists the possibilities and offers suggestions and warnings.
  12. Night Time Strategies for Meralgia. Meralgia sufferers dread nights with good reason. Instead of respite, they often bring prolonged suffering and leave you exhausted. That’s where this chapter comes in. It gives you all kinds of simple strategies for preventing those miserable nights and for dealing with pain when it occurs at night. You’ll soon be getting 8–10 hours of sleep again and waking refreshed.Thigh
  13. What is Meralgia? Slightly technical, this chapter digs a little deeper into the functional anatomy of Meralgia. File this in your ‘later reading’ draw if you have urgent symptoms.
  14. How Common is Meralgia? If misery loves company, then we’ve got plenty of company. There are literally millions of new cases of Meralgia every year, most of which go either unreported or undiagnosed. There. You feel better already, just knowing that.
  15. Disability Insurance and Meralgia. If you’re eligible for disability insurance or disability leave, read this chapter carefully. It contains all the information that your insurance company will need, along with their instructions to doctors who examine Meralgia patients. Disability insurance has its own set of rules. It pays to know them before you file.
  16. Clinical Experience with 14 Patients. There hasn’t been much research done on Meralgia, unfortunately for us, but you will find what there is in this chapter. Again, file this for later reading if you’re in pain.
  17. Long-Term Report12 Months After Contracting Meralgia. This is my own case history. I wrote it in the hopes that other sufferers will contribute their case histories, too. As soon as I have enough accounts of other people’s experiences I’ll update the book. I want this section to become a major part of the book in coming years.
  18. Laura’s Story. This is the first case history. Laura’s case is driving her nuts. Do you have any suggestions for her? (You can download the book here).

You can download Curing Meralgia Paresthetica from Amazon, here.

  1. Or download it from eBookit here.
  2. Or send me your questions at: [email protected]
  3. Curing Meralgia Paresthetica
  4. <link rel=”author” href=”Google Plus profile URL”/> <meta name=”google-site-verification” content=”NsuU6vZagAEHIL2o7XueWiRkZgSsLhyUkGzxJUBSmp8″ />
  5. Edit
10 Comments 
  1. David Brown permalink

    Hi – about 2 months ago I suddenly got (what I now know is) Meralgia Parathesia in my right thigh following a slight back issue. Was in excruciating pain in spite of a series of ever increasing strength painkillers prescribed by GP who was not a great deal of help. Passed out with pain twice & ended up in hopsital for a day. Physio was ok but recovery progress was slow & improvement seemed to have stalled after 3 weeks – not good for the mind! So decided to trawl internet & eventually found this website that is so informative. The self help page with the 3 exercises was just what I was looking for. Have been doing the exercises for 2 weeks now & improvement has been amazing & I am almost back to normal. I can’t thank you enough as it felt pretty bleak until I found out what I should be doing via your website. Pity my GP hasn’t had a look !!

    Edit

  2. I have been suffering severe Meralgia Paresthetica for almost six years now, each year the pain has gotten progressively worse, therefore my quality of life has decreased as I try to get through the day… And the night.
    I was super fit, had my personal training business, ran and stretched every day, ate healthy and didn’t abuse my body.
    I began to suffer during my third pregnancy, my OBGYN did not diagnose, I made the self diagnose through many days at google sites.. Then someone did listen to me, got tested, I’ve tried Garbepenten in combination with Endep, and made absolutely no difference, I had a couple anaesthetic blocks, which also have not had any effect…
    I have problems walking, cannot bear anyone touching my leg, cannot sit my children on my lap, can’t bear the thought of going to the beach as the last time , the waves really hurt me badly.
    Even the simplest of stretches are a distant memory, now I can’t even do a quad stretch 🙁
    My neurologist has tried to talk me into having surgery but with such a low success rate and a very high chance that it may come back worse I have not given in to his recommendations.

    Feel very frustrated and a distant person of who I really want to be…

    Edit

  3. Carol Jackson permalink

    After suffering for nearly 18 yrs after a c-section, I have finally after years of seeing my GP and being told nothing was wrong, I’ve been diagnosed with this awful condition AND only now been diagnosed as I saw a
    Tomporary Dr as my consultant was ill on the day of my appointment and he knew of the condition as he suffered from it too.
    I’ve been sent away with an open appointment and told to loose weight ….
    So still no treatment and days and nights of pain and no help.
    It’s driving me crazy and I don’t know what to do next
    From Carol

    Edit

    • Carol,

      I know it’s scary and painful. But there are lots of things you can do.

      Have you read the book and tried all the strategies in it?

      I spent a year researching it, trying everything in it (except the surgery) and describing it in detail.

      Let me know what you’ve tried….

      All the best,

      Godfree

      Edit

  4. I’ve recently been diagnosed (by my chiropractor) with MP. Had to cancel a trip to Italy and Croatia, which hurts almost as much as my right leg. I have the book and will be following the exercise regime hoping for results. I have severe burning and the sensation of thigh soreness as well as lower lumbar pain on right side. I’m guessing the impingement is in the groin and that pain refers both down the leg and up to back, with the leg being hotter and the back just achy. I’m wondering if exercising on a stationary recumbent bike would be useful to keep the leg strong without irritating the LFCN? Used muscle relaxers initially (first week), now just using Vicodin to keep pain manageable. I’m very fit, 65 and used to daily exercise. Any advice?

    Edit

    • Timothy,
      After hearing hundreds of stories from MP sufferers – I never anticipated becoming an expert on an obscure neurological condition! – I support the shotgun approach.
      MP is so variable in all its elements (the LFC nerve, for example, sometimes exits the spine at L2-L3 but sometimes elsewhere, and sometimes–apparently–not at all!) that its best to do everything you possibly can for as long as you can.
      My only caveat to your recumbent bike suggestion is that ankle-flexion with pressure can exacerbate the symptoms. If you try it let me know your body’s response.
      Certainly you should be exercising as much as possible. I was appalled at the damage my MP episode did to my body: atrophied thigh muscles, shortened right side of the body. I’m still undoing that because I didn’t know then what I know now.
      Did you read the MP book? It’s downloadable at Amazon.

      Edit

  5. can you only download this book? no hard cover copy? I don’t have a kindle, ipad or nook. i would prefer to buy a hard copy.

    Edit

Leave a Reply 

2 thoughts on “Curing Meralgia Paresthetica”

  1. Oddly my MP is mainly only at night and seems to have been triggered by lossing 65 lbs to get better control of my diabetes. Apparently lossing the fat layer of the hip can be just as bad as having fat press against the nerve. I can’t figure what I do different on days I don’t have problems and ones I do. I sleep on my right side and my left hip is what suddenly is lightening strikes and burning pain and nothing helps, I get up and down, and then it is time to go to work. Exhausted and depressed. Luckily it isn’t every night, or I’d be dead from lack of sleep.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *